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we saw was on election day, the last several elections, except for last time with barack obama being elected, there were minimal gains in this market or losses. it was flat on the session. to what do you attribute this triple-digit move? >> i wouldn't look too closely in today's move. you may, in fact, see another couple of percentage points on the upside. keep in mind that the u.s. economy is still growing at a 1% to 2% happenedndle on gdp. like your previous guests mentioned, this fiscal drag that will occur in 2013. so, you know, 1% move in the market today is just noise. we have to look towards what global gdp is going over the course of the next 18 months. that's decelerating. >> so what you're saying, chad, is it doesn't mat who ater who the white house. >> 2013 is going to look exactly like 2012. global gdp will be decelerating. the u.s. economy should perhaps be at a 1% to 2% gdp growth trajectory. that's including a fiscal drag in the united states of about 1%. that's our baseline assumption. but one should consider also that over in europe, you're going to be going into a r
at the presidential outcome, i think right now the edge seems to be at obama based on the polls. but well within the margin of error. so, if you saw a romney victory, i would disagree with rick, i think you could see a pop in the markets if we saw a romney victory. from ourve, if you want to look at what you emphasize, tradeable themes on the republican side and democratic side. if you wanted to play tradeable themes on republican side for a romney victory, clearly you're looking at defense, energy, potentially you're looking at some of the finance sectors. on the democratic side, if president obama prevails, i think the themes you'd be playing are alternative energy, selectively health care and infrastructure. the themes are there. i just think the macro picture is really positive around the globe. improving china, a little softer condition and background in europe politically. and i think improving conditions here in the u.s. for the consumer and for manufacturing and for gdp in general. our general background is pretty positive. >> great points there. sandy, what about you? you say regardless
clear message to president obama, which s oh, you think you know business, watch this. so now you're going to learn and you're going to learn real fast. a correspondence course is not going to help. we're going to be all over the place. my sense is until we get through with gridlock -- we had the federal reserve giving us all the money we needed. obviously markets like that. until we're convinced we're out of the woods with gridlock, i don't know where we can go. >> it's interesting. i think john boehner in that speech he made just a few minutes ago basically opened the door for higher taxes. this is part of the reason the mark sold off today. now we know the republicans are going to have to swallow it. they have been adamant about no new taxes, but this is where we are going. david, you say don't make any portfolio changes in light of the obama victory. what moves are you making today? no radical changes? >> we wouldn't be changing too much. the stocks that sold off today were some that were under the greatest pressure during the first administration. there's really no change. we
obama and john boehner. here's how we finished the day on wall street, near the highs. up 105 points. 12,983. we'll have technicians looking at this day, seeing if it's a key reversal. the s&p also in positive territory. market driven by headlines and bluster out of washington. yep, that's what investors should expect short term. maybe until january 1st. should they also expect a rally any time soon? according to ryan dieterich, rally could most definitely be headed our way. >> he joins us now to explain along with peter anderson from congress asset management company. bill mcvail from turner investment partners and our very own rick santelli. peter, i have to begin with you. with a name like congress asset management, is congress going to come through for your assets? >> well, i wish i had an inside scoop on that, but unfortunately, we're also left to speculate at this point. but i will say this. what's incredible about this market is the way the market moved up today, it's an instant polling network that the government can use, actually, to kind of float trial balloons to us and get a
live from chicago. this market selling off again today. the market down 5% since president obama was re-elected. add on to that a 200-point selloff today. the dow with a decline of 184 points on the session. that's 1.5%. s&p 500 also down about 5% since the president re-elected. down about 20 points today. nasdaq down 37 points today. that's 1.25%. today, many of the recent winners were the big losers. we have been seeing recently money moving into transportation stocks. today, they got killed. financials also under pressure and tech nothing on the downside. the market seeing red across the board as the fiscal cliff fears escalate today after the president takes a hard line in his news conference earlier this afternoon. joining me now to help break down the trading day and what you should be doing with your money, kwint, quint is joining me. we also have john buckingham of al frank asset management. thanks, everybody, for joining us. first, michelle, let me get your news, the latest on the attack out of israel on hamas. this, of course, another major news story today that we're followin
. the averages are closing lower for a second straight day following president obama's re-election. a number of the names that moved on potential policy implications changed course today. financials were wednesday's biggest losers as fear of continued regulation under president obama sent investors elsewhere. the group is still negative overall on the session. it was one of the better performing sectors today as a number of banks are on the upswing. let's go through them. isi upgrading bank of america saying the bank has mtie capital ratios and lower operating costs. that's pushing shares up almost 2%. we're up as much as 2.5% minutes before the close. u.s. regulators approve jpmorgan's $3 billion stock buyback. that was lifting shares earlier. as you can see, finished lower with the rest of the group at the end of trade. hospital stocks did soar wednesday now that we know obamacare is likely here to stay. now hoptd names are selling off. down about 4% or more. those concerns about coal persisted in thursday's trade. they continued to slide lower as investors bet the president's re-election
of what the impact of four more years of president obama will be on business and on jpmorgan. >> well, i think the first thing is the foundation of business is actually pretty strong. companies are in very good shape. a lot of cash. if you look at the numbers, housing looks like it's turning. household formation is going up. consumers have consumers are still spending. the american economy, to me the most important thing is we solve the sort-run fiscal cliff and the longer run fiscal issues. i think if we do that, the economy can boom. i hope that president obama, you know, works on that. i think he has been working on that. >> and you've been traveling a lot. i know technology has been important as well. i want to get to that in a moment. you mentioned the fiscal cliff. let's stay there for a moment. what are the implications of going over the fiscal cliff. you've been vocal on this subject. you created a task force. you've take an lead in terms of fixing the debt. what are the implications of going off that fiscal cliff? >> let's separate the two. jpmorgan is one of a couple hundred co
on treasurietreasur. as soon as boehner and obama walk out of the white house, which i believe they'll do at some stage over the next month, as soon as that happens, everything is going to flip the other way. i'd like to find a way to play the market, but i think for long-term investors, valuation gets more and more important. the more you stretch things out. the key thing people are miss -- i agree with rick, the economy is not that strong, but it is still growing steadily and valuations are so extreme that you know which way the money is going to go when things settle down. i just wouldn't want to be on the wrong side of that trade. >> stephanie, that's basically the way you feel. you have sort of opportunities out there. how do you see it, stephanie? >> i think what you want to do is use the volatility, use the declines, and go back to the companies that reported good third quarter earnings. go back to an ebay. >> stick to fundamentals. >> right. go back to starbucks. or you also can focus on some of the themes, right. housing is still in recovery mode and that -- i know it's well known, but i
. indeed, president obama in an interview last week, mentioned that he thinks there will be a solution, a grand bargain, sometime in the first six months of 2013. six months. that's a long time to get this it problem straightened out. >> yeah, so, i mean, if we do get an agreement in six months, does that mean that the u.s. doesn't go into a recession? >> well, first i want to say the metaphor fiscal cliff is probably the wrong one. you step off a cliff, that's your last step. for many politicians, the real metaphor is it's a slope. they gradually go into these tax increases and spending cuts. they feel they can turn around and walk back up the slope, retroactively reverse the changes. in that circumstance, in that scenario, it creates a lot of uncertainty for businesses and for taxpayers. what will our taxes be next year? how are we going to make some plans for our business or personal finances? it's that uncertainty that's going to, i think, have adverse effects for the economy. >> okay. that makes a lot of sense. michael jones, how do you want to invest here with all this? >> i thin
think we'll see higher taxes whether we get those through reduced deductions or obama care surtax. a lot of high quality businesses that pay the $210 billion from the treasury. >> so which companies would you still be buying even if taxes go higher? what's your expectation? are we talking about going up to ordinary income, 40%? are we talking about 25%? what's your betting? >> maria, i mean, i think at this point it's kind of baked in that we're going to, you know, 438. i think we're looking for a disconnect between market and value in a market that's overannualized. we found a few that have certainly come off a good bit. there's a disconnect. and that's where we will continue to invest. going forward. >> are you saying -- are you saying you think dividend tax is going to 43%? >> well, i think that's what's in effected going to effectively happen with obama care. i mean, you know, you're going to have a 3.8% surtax. i don't know. we'll see. maybe they'll kick the can down the road and we'll become greece. i don't know. >> oh, god. you have -- wow. robert, jump in here, from jensen invest
to see everybody. thanks for joining us. carol, what are you expecting in 2013 under president obama's policies? >> i'm not expecting anything very good, maria. i think that we're going to end up with some sort of a slow down. i think whatever the compromise that ends up being made under this grand bargain, it's going to be something that ends up hurting unemployment. that being said, i think there's always a tale of two markets. from a broader market standpoint, i expect the market to be hurting. there's always opportunities to be had. >> steve, you have some breaking news earlier. you reported on janet yellen. tell us what that says about where we're headed in terms of economic growth in 2013. >> well, i think it tells us the fed is going to remain as loose as it possibly can through '13, '14, '15, and now even '16. janet yellen saying an optimal policy path, one that stays as close to 2% on inflation and tries to get the unemployment rate down to 6% could mean the fed remains easy through early 2016. by the way, they're thinking of scrapping all of that calendar date guidance thro
are getting down to the brass tax on the fiscal cliff tomorrow. president obama and congressional leaders meet face to face with the clock ticking to new year's on the fiscal cliff. for nearly two years, the one plan that has gotten the most support among those outside of washington and even inside has been the simpson/bowles plan. the two, of course, chaired president obama's debt commission. two years ago when the plan was presented, it was all but ignored by those in power. joining me now, the two architects behind the plan, former republican senator alan simpson and former chief of staff for democratic president bill clinton erskine bowles. gentlemen, wonderful to have you on the program. i want to first get to this. have either of you or together both of you been asked to participate in any way in these fiscal cliff negotiations? >> i've talked to most of the members of the white house. i met over the last couple of days with what's called the gang of eight, four republican senators and four democrat senators. i'm going to update alan as soon as this ends. >> senator, you have not been in
. unemployment is higher today than when barack obama took office. think of that. >> now, maria, both candidates are going to be in ohio. crucial, all-important ohio, this weekend with just three full campaign days left until election day. there's a lot to be decided here and a lot riding on the next couple days. >> absolutely. thanks very much. my next guest says the jobs numbers are evidence, in fact that, the economy is making steady progress. here to make his case is andy stern. he's former president of the service employees international union. now a senior fellow at columbia university. before we get to that, there have been unconfirmed reports -- thanks for joining us, andy. >> good to be here. >> utility crews from out of state that are not unionized, they're getting a hard time, even turned away, by unionized local crews. have you heard this? what can you tell us? >> i haven't heard this. i would hope it's not true. this is a time -- i grew up in new jersey. i lived in new york. i saw a lot of devastatiodevast. we're all americans. we need to figure this out. >> and come together, sure.
' testimony. but he did shed a little light on the political controversy, about what u.n. ambassador, obama u.n. a.m. bas door susan rice, said or did not say five days after the tragedy when she went on the sunday talk shows. nbc's "meet the press" specifically, and denied there was al qaeda involvement saying the earlier stories that there had been a riot gone wrong is what u.s. intelligence still believed was the case in libya. petraeus testified, according to those who heard his testimony, that the cia, in fact, believed immediately that al qaeda and another terrorist group was involved and wrote for public consumption some bullet points, which included that assumption by the cia. they went to other agencies quickly so they could get out publicly. five days later, rice denied al qaeda involvement. peter king, the republican from new york, said somebody took out the reference to al qaeda, which had been dumbed down, if you will, to the word extremist and then virtually eliminated from this public, nonclassified report. so, bill, the controversy continues. did susan rice say something publi
president obama for the next four years? he's got a much different mentality. >> i'm a social liberal fiscal conservative. my party doesn't really exist. i thought if the nation got burr rid under trillions of debt, there would be nothing to talk about. we wouldn't have a social agenda. >> we're close to it. >> 16 on our way to 20. then you lose options. you go over an edge where you're only services debt. today our interest expense is like $120 billion or so. 4% on $20 is $500 billion. that overwhelms all the discretionary spending. somebody has to get serious in washington. i'm hoping obama is coming to be a great president, which has come to the center. he inherited a bad economy. there's no doubt, right? but we haven't made a lot of progress. we haven't given business a lot of confidence. we have $1 trillion -- >> antagonistic with business. >> we would call it antagonistic. a lot of listening but not a lot of hearing. i'm supposed to go -- i won't say that. >> you're going to go to the white house. >> maybe. >> why would you go to the white house? you think he's listening? all these pho
. there are legal challenges to two of the board's members over recess appointments made by president obama last january. as for black friday, 35 million shoppers showed up at walmart stores nationwide last year. the retail giant says it's not changing anything due to those planned protests on friday. maria. >> all right. thanks so much. so should the workers that choose to walk out be fired from their job ps diana roth says a resounding yes. richard says absolutely not. both join me now to hash it out. good to see you both. diana, you say these workers should be fired? >> if i walked off my job, i would get fired. i am not a lawyer. maybe it's yes, maybe it's no. the important thing to say is that joining a union would not be good for walmart employees. if you just look at food and commercial workers union pension plans, they are dramatically underfunded. the tristate pension plan is funded at about 65%. the northern california one at about 55%. these walmart employees would be f paying for the pensions of retired employees of other companies and it would be very difficult for them to fwget the
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16

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